Unbranding the Brand II

Unbranding, it appears from my research, is a term used to describe a fix, meaning one or more of the following:

The brand has been somehow damaged. The Value Jet plain crash is an example of this. Photo used under Fair Use
The market is saturated and cannot support the same shop over and over again. Starbuck’s has been opening new locations named after the street address in an effort to capture fresh markets. Photo used under Creative Commons
The decision makers in the organization decide that the brand is in need of revision or update. Photo used under Pulic Domain

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My idea of unbranding, in the context of this discussion, goes more to the question raised by John Freeman in the previous post when he said that he “hated brands.” The comment was made in the context of a discussion about storefront design. My interpretation of this is that he hated the uniformity, the lack of surprise, even the visual dominance of the well known brands. This describes a store design problem that is related too, but not the same as “unbranding” as a fix.

As an additional note I should say that bigger business brains than mine are describing this “unbranding” trend that I have seen coming for a while.  This article  in Harvard Business Review is important enough to retailers for me to reference it here.  Continued in Part III.)

Known Brand
Known Brand
Known Brand
Known Brand
Known Brand
Known Brand

 

 

 

 

Bridget Gaddis, is a Licensed Architect and LEED-accredited Professional practicing nationally, and locally in the Washington DC area. She holds professional degrees in both Architecture and Interior Design, and with a comprehensive background in commercial retail design, planning and construction has completed projects for such for such well known brands as Chloe, Zegna, and Bvlgari. Her career began in tenant coordination and site planning for two well-known Cleveland developers, followed by six years in store planning for a national retailer. After a move to New York City in 1997, she spent the next years working for architecture firms specializing in retail projects. In 2011 she started her own practice in Alexandria, VA. Ms. Gaddis is the author of two blogs dealing with architectural subjects.

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