Federal Business Development and Marketing for Service Providers (Event)

Start Manage and Grow with the Alexandria SBDCSo you want to provide services to the federal government. Where do you begin to develop your book of business? How do you identify opportunities? How do you get face time with government staff?

Join us for the second in an interactive series of START, MANAGE, GROW your business workshops for federal contractors.  Workshop # 1 gave you the top 10 proven activities you need to do to obtain federal business.  In this workshop, Federal Contracting Consultant John Boulware will provide suggestions on how service providers can conduct Federal business development activities.  He’ll give service providers tips on how to identify Federal opportunities and how to get meetings with government staff.  He’ll also discuss reasons why some development efforts for services fail. He’ll also identify critical actions you shouldn’t do when seeking a federal contract.

REGISTER NOW

This FREE federal contracting SMART, MANAGE, GROW your business workshop is sponsored by the Alexandria Small Business Development Center and the Alexandria Economic Development Partnership.

Join us at for two hours of interactive programming in our new office Board Room, 625 North Washington Street, Alexandria, VA beginning at 9:00 AM.    Learn federal contracting from someone who has seen it all through 23 years federal teaming and subcontracting experience.  John expects you to bring your questions!

 

Save the date for these other federal contracting workshops:
  • Tuesday, March 13: “Federal Proposal Development – Focus on Technical Proposal” presented by John Boulware, Federal Contractor Consultant
  • Tuesday, March 27: “Federal Proposal Development – Focus on Cost Proposal”presented by Sequin Lukon, The Essential Agreement, LLC
  • Tuesday, April 24: “Subcontracting to Prime Federal Contractors” presented by Sequin Lukon, The Essential Agreement, LLC
  • Tuesday, May 8: “Financing for Government Contracting: The Importance of Timing” presented by Barbara Greenwald of Sheinwald Financial Strategies.

For more information these and other SBDC trainings and programs, please contact:
Genny Lush
www.alexandriasbdc.org

Funded in part through a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Small Business Administration.

What He Learned From His Small Business Entrepreneur Dad

I came across this article, Entrepreneurship – What I Learned From my Dad,” (over at the Under30CEO blog) a couple of days ago and really thought it was worth sharing and commenting on for several reasons (even with its technical flaws). My primary interests in his story are how he recognize that starting a business is a very personal, family and creative process, and his remembrance, even from his  youth, of what his father-entrepreneur sacrificed to start this small business.

While I can’t speak for all small business entrepreneurs, I remember my first business and how  as the author describes it as “similar becoming a parent for the first time.” He was able to see his father in action, even worked alongside him. I didn’t have the opportunity to have a entrepreneurial dad (as I was raised for significant portion of my life by my beloved mom) and when my mom and step-dad started their first entrepreneurial endeavor it was after I had already been in business several years. I was not ready for the journey I set out on that first venture, but somehow by grace I was able to make it successful and I learned from my mistakes, good luck and perseverance. My point is to the entrepreneurial parents out there reading this, your children will benefit from you introducing them to the why’s and how’s of starting and managing your small business.

And, speaking of the business start-up phase, for any of you who have been through it, you know how much you must pour into the company in those early days. It’s not just money; neither only time. In my mind, it’s always analogous to a railroad track unfinished with a locomotive barreling down the path. You’re the one who needs to source the track, lay the track and make sure everything’s secure before that locomotive reaches, but in essence with a small business you’re never quite done laying that track. All that said, it’s an intensely joyful process once you learn the ropes, get better with your hammer (be that sourcing your products, or getting that additional certification to woo customers to your service) and the locomotive stops to pick up passengers (i.e., vacations and those “golden goose” client sales moments).

Photo courtesy of KellyB.