Should I Hire an Employee?

The decision on whether to hire a person is especially critical whether you are just beginning to grow or need specialists you are not sure you can afford.How do you decide whether or not to hire employees?ASK YOURSELF:  1. Is this work which must be done over a long term?

If the work is on-going and critical to your organization’s success, consider hiring or leasing an employee.  If it is not, consider other options.

Work can be done by independent contractors who specialize in the area, by temporary staffing services, by consultants for a project or a specific need, by an interim executive, by a paid intern, or by sub-contracting.  Would one of these options work better for you?

Too often, small organizations add a non-core position because of short-term or part-time needs and then realize that work has expanded to fill the time, not because of actual necessity.  So a real 10-20 hour a week need has become a full-time employee.

2. Can I afford to hire a regular employee?

Hiring employees who support your revenue or mission growth is smart.  But once you hire, you cannot skip pay periods, tax or legal obligations.  Costs
include the person’s pay and also:
* mandated benefits including: OASDI (‘Social security’ and Medicare), unemployment insurance, workers compensation insurance
* costs for space and equipment for the employee
* pay processing and accounts establishment costs
* legal compliance and risk management costs

Check out your state’s small business services or your local economic development agency – these provide detailed guidance on any local laws you need to comply with.

OK, I want an Employee

Think: What type of work and level do I really need?

Classically, small employers want folks to wear multiple hats.  But the work combinations must make sense and be right for your organization’s needs.

There may be a terrific sales person who is happy to be doing administrative work half of the time but it is unlikely!   Two part-timers or outsourcing one part makes far more sense where the work needs are very different.

The other classic is to want a senior-level person to show you are growing and to get some strategic advice, but want that person to also do basic level work.  A CTO is not going to do programming.  And hiring a CxO of any sort usually results in hiring several more layers as well.  So, you had a Manager of Accounting and one accounting clerk before and now have a CFO and 5 staff, but no more revenues.

Not sure how to structure a position?

Take a good look at similar job ads from larger organizations: what set of skills and requirements do they combine?  Many put fairly detailed descriptions on their website employment section.  Check to see if your trade association offers sample job descriptions you could tailor to your needs.  Ask other business owners.  Ask your vendors in that area for ideas.

Before you add a position, make a clear list of exactly what business necessity creates the need, all specific responsibilities that need to be fulfilled, and what increased revenue will result.

OK I’ll outsource    I don’t need an employee, but the work needs to be done.

Make a list of potential options.  As with an employee, structure the work clearly.  Ask your advisors and network for recommendations.  Current vendors are a great resource; e.g., CPAs often know other services providers, such as IT support, and can recommend people to meet your needs.

Grow Smart!

Hiring people who can contribute to your organization’s growth and success is an important step.  A little thought and effort first to ensure you only add costs you can afford and you spend your money on the best possible solution for your needs will repay you handsomely.  Unfortunately, too often the opposite is true – and having a staff becomes a nightmare of added work, added costs, and negative results.

Ask questions, seek advice, consider alternatives – do all the things that you would do before offering any new product or service to your customers or clients.  You will grow much more successfully with less hassle if you do!

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