In Search of the Perfect Daytime Storefront: VII. Simply Successful

I deliberately left the storefront sign out of this photo in an effort to help the viewer maintain objectivity. Can you determine what product is sold here? High contrast graphics are artfully installed first on the storefront glass and then repeated on the white backdrop in first a lighter color and second a smaller scale, creating the previously discussed concept of visual cognition and leading the shopper to focus on the dinnerware. Not surprising then, that the store is Bed Bath and Beyond. Further, the street reflections are kept to a minimum by the awning. Adding a few pieces of colored dinnerware into the mix might have been an improvement, but the window is nevertheless simple and successful as is. In my experience it takes a true professional to practice the restraint necessary to implement such a sophisticated design.

Bridget Gaddis, is a Licensed Architect and LEED-accredited Professional practicing nationally, and locally in the Washington DC area. She holds professional degrees in both Architecture and Interior Design, and with a comprehensive background in commercial retail design, planning and construction has completed projects for such for such well known brands as Chloe, Zegna, and Bvlgari. Her career began in tenant coordination and site planning for two well-known Cleveland developers, followed by six years in store planning for a national retailer. After a move to New York City in 1997, she spent the next years working for architecture firms specializing in retail projects. In 2011 she started her own practice in Alexandria, VA. Ms. Gaddis is the author of two blogs dealing with architectural subjects.