Wire Management is a Design Issue

The cash wrap in the photo above is in a medium high end fashion boutique in a trendy “New Urban” style shopping center with other similar competitors up and down the center. I noted the problem during a site visit I made to meet with the shop owner who was, at the time, planning a second store. Two years later, motivated by recent discussions in these “Insights” about the importance of integrating technology into a store design, I returned and took this photo. Needless to say, the problem was never addressed, neither did I ever work with this retailer.

I see mismanaged wires a lot, often in places that should, and do, know better. I listen to marketers go on about the importance of creating a shopping experience; of integrating technology into the store design; of carefully selecting technologies based on actual individual data driven market research, all the time wondering by what trickery retailers like those in the photos are able to make out that these much touted market strategies are somehow not germane to their particular retail environments. Further, I can only guess at the impact on sales – at least the place in the photo is still open – and I actually worry about the tripping hazards just waiting to happen. There is really no accounting for this when a solution is easily accomplished and not expensive.

Lest I be accused of “dis without fix,” I offer a solution here. First we are not talking store remodel or even new equipment. All that is required is some planning. Consider this cash wrap, a version of which was originally designed for a project, and which has since morphed into one of my “go to” opportunities to offer design variations on a functional theme. It is 5′ wide by 2′ deep by 3′ high at the work surface and 3’6″ high at the top of the display case. Close examination of the equipment housed in the unit will show that virtually every device housed in the badly wired cash wrap in first photo is accommodated in a compact cabinet. No wires show. The only connections are, as in the subject image above, power and data supplied by a floor outlet below the cabinet. Also, if necessary this fixture can be supplied with “knock outs” for power/data access from either side and it is on casters for mobility.

Clearly this is not a cheap piece of furniture, probably costing upwards of $1000 to build from scratch, yet when considered in terms of value added to the retail environment, it is not a lot to spend. Certainly, in terms of public safety and reduced liability it is a downright bargain. Neither is it necessary to build one of these from scratch. The rustic bench being used for the cash wrap above could easily and cheaply be remodeled by addition of an equally rustic back panel. We do this type of thing all the time.

Something else a retailer might want to consider when planning a store is that wireless technologies and newer devices are drastically reducing the amount of space needed. These are part of more than just cash wraps too. It is really important for a retailer to examine their options and choose their system(s) early. I cannot over emphasize the advantage of selecting and working with a qualified technology consultant who can help with system selection and provide a designer with device specifications including related sizes to be used in store planning and fixture design.

One more point worth noting, I see this problem show up in many showroom and public environments, not just retail stores. Because these are places where the public meets a business or organization they can, and do, impact a brand and may affect sales. I often work in these types of environments and likewise advise a client to carefully manage the wires.

Bridget Gaddis, is a Licensed Architect and LEED-accredited Professional practicing nationally, and locally in the Washington DC area. She holds professional degrees in both Architecture and Interior Design, and with a comprehensive background in commercial retail design, planning and construction has completed projects for such for such well known brands as Chloe, Zegna, and Bvlgari. Her career began in tenant coordination and site planning for two well-known Cleveland developers, followed by six years in store planning for a national retailer. After a move to New York City in 1997, she spent the next years working for architecture firms specializing in retail projects. In 2011 she started her own practice in Alexandria, VA. Ms. Gaddis is the author of two blogs dealing with architectural subjects.

What’s the Industry Coming To?! Let’s Put Online Recruiting in Its (Proper) Place!

If the definition of insanity is repeating the same actions and expecting different results, the world of online job recruiting is certifiably bonkers. I encounter one or more of the following scenarios EVERY day. Disillusioned recruiters post job oppo…

If the definition of insanity is repeating the same actions and expecting different results, the world of online job recruiting is certifiably bonkers. I encounter one or more of the following scenarios EVERY day. Disillusioned recruiters post job opportunities online knowing that A-list candidates rarely submit resumes online. Frustrated hiring managers express disappointment over the quality of candidates sent to ...

Phone Interview Therapy: How to Solve the Compliance vs. Connection Conundrum

What activity comes to mind when you read this description: A thoughtful conversation with a professional who draws out a person’s passions and goals to evaluate the next best step. If a good therapy or coaching session was your first thought, I don’t blame you. I’m sure a telephone job interview didn’t cross your mind. In fact, people rank job …

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Seamless integration of technology is part and parcel of 2017 market trends

Playing with an interactive light display.

Marketing Trends for 2017 – There is always a flurry of activity from marketing and PR firms at this time of year. The event put on by the Alexandria Small Business Development Center is always well attended, and this year is no different. Maurisa Potts, Fouder & CEO of Spotted MP, talking about 2017 market trends, discussed the increasing importance of interactive and visual content; digital as in media being the unstated but nevertheless operative word. Commenting in Forbes on similar trends, AJ Agrawal listed seventeen trends for 2017, twelve of which were likewise to do with digital content. The impact of technology has of course been growing every year, leading me to wonder if/when it will finally peak. Not, it would appear, anytime soon as almost all of the topics in Pott’s presentation, i.e., Interactive Content, Visual Content, Influencer Marketing, Virtual Reality, Mobile Video, Live Broadcasts, Short Form Content, Mobile First, Personalization, and Native Content, presumed digital content.

Shopping in Walmart

Data Driven Marketing – That said, it may be that the saturation point is approaching, as Potts also talked about the necessity for “Data Driven Marketing” and Lee Peterson of WD Partners talking about digital integration in VMSD Forecast for 2017 pointed out that when surveyed, for 3 years in a row the digital device most wanted by customers was BOPIS, the ability to buy online and pick up in the store. If, it would seem, last year’s omnichannel marketing was about integrating the message into the larger stream, then this year is about flushing out the individual retailers best path to success. A bike shop owner might, in 2016, have been compelled to have a presence in every possible outlet, i.e, blogs, competitions, associations, civic events, publications, website, e-commerce, indeed anything having to do with bikes or bicycling. In 2017 this bike shop owner might look closely at the data accumulated from past marketing activities and then focus on what has worked, even if the answer is unexpected. For example Kathleen Jordan writing for VMSD tells us, ” Retailers must develop new ways to reach their audience and find new sources to expand their consumer base… it must be recognized that online is not always the answer.” Did you notice she called them an audience rather than customers or shoppers.

Microsoft Surface at Hard Rock Cafe, Hollywood

Integrated Shopping Experience – Considering that almost 92 percent of all retail sales are still being transacted in physical environments and further that many online retailers end up with physical stores, I am lead to inquire, what does all this say to those of us involved with the bricks and mortar part of retail, presuming of course that it is not going away? Clearly, creating a shopping experience is still important. Eric Feigenbaum subtitled his article in VMSD, “…Retail’s divining rod no longer moves at p-o-s, but rather at p-o-e – point of experience.”

Prioritize – From my perspective, after many years working in retail design, the answer must be about priorities. The seamless integration of technology is part and parcel of the all important shopping experience and it can only be accomplished by assimilating a clients carefully worked out digital marketing plan into a store design by partnering with the technical experts. The devices of digital marketing are, after all, physical elements and as such work better when addressed in “pre” as apposed to post design.

Virtual Book at “Librovision”

If there is any doubt that this is an often neglected fact, just look around at piles of wire shoved under cabinets, dangling from display cases, hap hazardously placed equipment closets, and my personal favorite, the back side of monitors at POS stations. Certainly newer wireless technologies are available but there are always performance issues to consider, many requiring additional equipment in other areas. Most clients have enough understanding of Building mechanical systems like HVAC and plumbing to expect and allow for their accommodation, but somehow the lexicon of electronic equipment has remained a mystery, not a little, I should add, because it is in a constant state of flux. Ryan Ruud, founder and CEO of Lake One, writing for “Smart Insights” identifies Random Acts Of Technology (RAT) as marketing flops resulting from the application of technology without strategy. I would argue that this applies, as well, to the physical store design whenever non integrated electronics are treated as project add ons – and okay, I liked the buzzword too!

Bring in an Expert – Finally, I would advise any retailer aiming in 2017 for “…effective in-store digital retail experiences” to introduce a suitable technology consultant into the schematic stage of a project and then keep him or her involved up through and even after store opening. Sometimes independent and small retailers assume that these services are beyond their reach. On the contrary, I have found that most electronic designers are also providers and as such their services are often included when they supply and install equipment. It is money well spent, almost – but not quite – as good as that spent on the Architect.

Bridget Gaddis, is a Licensed Architect and LEED-accredited Professional practicing nationally, and locally in the Washington DC area. She holds professional degrees in both Architecture and Interior Design, and with a comprehensive background in commercial retail design, planning and construction has completed projects for such for such well known brands as Chloe, Zegna, and Bvlgari. Her career began in tenant coordination and site planning for two well-known Cleveland developers, followed by six years in store planning for a national retailer. After a move to New York City in 1997, she spent the next years working for architecture firms specializing in retail projects. In 2011 she started her own practice in Alexandria, VA. Ms. Gaddis is the author of two blogs dealing with architectural subjects.

Live Your Life with Intention–It’s a Savvy Business Strategy!

On Christmas Day 2015, I shifted my mindset forever. An unexpected and unwelcome event transformed my approach to my life — my work, my family . . . everything. On that day, I was rushed into emergency surgery for a twisted colon. My doctor later described my condition as “30 minutes from done.” There was no lifestyle change or good …

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Looking for a model? Companies ARE already purple, America!

Business leaders are expected to leave politics out of the workplace and, for the most part, that’s probably good advice. However, businesses are made up of people and people chose sides on November 8 or opted out of the process altogether. Some of those people were delighted with the results partying into the wee hours of the workday calling in …

Business leaders are expected to leave politics out of the workplace and, for the most part, that’s probably good advice. However, businesses are made up of people and people chose sides on November 8 or opted out of the process altogether. Some of those people were delighted with the results partying into the wee hours of the workday calling in ...

Owning Recruiting: Outsourced Recruiting Partners

This is the final installment in our series on working with recruiting partners. In my previous post, we discussed options if a client wants to “manage” recruiting.  These options include executive, contingent, and staffing firms.  As discussed, each plays a unique role in talent acquisition and it is not uncommon to have all three operating at once in a firm.  …

This is the final installment in our series on working with recruiting partners. In my previous post, we discussed options if a client wants to “manage” recruiting.  These options include executive, contingent, and staffing firms.  As discussed, each plays a unique role in talent acquisition and it is not uncommon to have all three operating at once in a firm.  ...

Small Business and Teaming Agreements, Part II

Disclaimer – I am not licensed to practice law or give legal advice.  The information written in this blog is based on my experience negotiating hundreds of teaming agreements for large and small businesses over my 20+ years in Government Contracting.

In Part I of the blog, I discussed why Government contractors team and how teaming agreements typically work. In Part II I will discuss terms and conditions that I have personally negotiated most often and why they are important to small business owners. This list is not all inclusive and may be different from one organization to the next in terms of importance.

Workshare – Most RFPs will describe work and tasks that are to be performed during the potential contract. Workshare is the portion of work that you will receive if everything goes as planned in the RFP.  Some primes will not guarantee any work prior to winning the contract, if you can negotiate a percentage of workshare in writing that will only assist you with future planning of resources. I mention percentage of workshare versus specific full time employed/equivalent positions (FTEs) because the Government can change or delete tasks during the amendment phase of an RFP and if you have a specific percentage instead of a FTEs, you have a better chance of receiving the same percentage vs losing specific positions.

Exclusivity – The prime contractor will normally require that once you become a team member, that you will not work with any other companies on that particular pursuit.  It is important to ensure that there is no statement that prevents you from teaming with other partners for that same client on different pursuits or providing your normal services to that same client for work outside of this pursuit.

Advertising – Many agreements will require that you get permission from the Prime before you are allowed to advertise the contract win. A win for the Prime is a win for you, and of course you would like to share that information with the world. Requesting that the prime not unreasonably withhold their permission is important in this area.

Indemnity – An indemnity is an obligation by a person (indemnitor) to provide compensation for a particular loss suffered by another person (indemnitee).  As the sub, when you see this clause, you should at the very least ask for the same protection that the prime requires of you in case of an incident.

Proposal Participation – If you can participate with the prime in proposal preparation, it is important that the prime’s expectations are spelled out and you have the resources to contribute whatever you agree to.

Governing Law – Specifies that the laws of a mutually agreed upon jurisdiction will govern the interpretation and enforcement of the terms of the contract. In this case, you would obviously want to have any legal action addressed where your company does business, or in a state that you and the prime can agree upon.

Intellectual Property – A work or invention that is the result of creativity, such as a manuscript or a design, to which one has rights and for which one may apply for a patent, copyright, trademark, etc.  As a sub, you want to retain the rights to any intellectual property that you designed or developed.

Term – This includes the length of the teaming agreement as well as the conditions that would terminate the agreement.  It is important to pay close attention as these items will vary from one teaming agreement to the next.

Teaming Agreements are a very important piece of the puzzle as they can determine what happens down the road with relationships and future business.  It is imperative that you have someone that is familiar with negotiating the key terms and conditions and who can represent your organizations best interest.