The Storefront Design Process: Architecture? Graphic Design? Signage Design? Display, All of the Above

Anatomy of a Design Concept. For more information or to see image enlargements please contact us here.

Client’s Visions – Clients often call me because they see something  suggestive in the portfolio on our site and want to create a similar look or physical presence for their own businesses. They may entertain visions of compelling displays that increase awareness and transform window shoppers into customers, or perhaps it is about creating and reinforcing an organization’s image, idea, point of view, or brand.

Design is a Process – Whatever the motivation, few would dispute that successful design is part and parcel of equally successful marketing campaigns evolving from resources and collaborations requiring lots of man hours. Design is a process which is always, at least on some level, retail.

Not a Commodity – Yet the business environment, including the traditional “fee for service” world in which most of us work, leads many to conclude that design is a commodity, something to be ordered from a price list. It forces an architect to quantify a client’s vision for a project into a competitive proposal before any serious work is done towards understanding that vision. It can be limiting and is often fraught with undefined expectations. It is not a model that works very well in a collaborative environment. Nevertheless, it always determines if and how a project moves forward.

Reconciliation – Overcoming this disparity has been a longtime goal of ours.  Consider this: if I tell a client that the fee for architectural services on a project will be a fixed amount, he may want to negotiate some concession, etc., but in general he feels secure and accepts the fee. If, on the other hand, I tell this client that the fee will not exceed a certain amount, he/she is thrown into a state of indecision and becomes unsure about how to proceed. Ask your self why? What makes a client back away, sometimes even leaving off an entire project?

Expressing a Vision – The answer is surprisingly simple. Both models require and deliver basically the same thing, that being a new design in which the client has participated. The difference is that, with the “not to exceed” fee for service model, the client is made aware that he is an active participant in the design process and as such has the ability, by effective communication, to affect not only the outcome, but also its final cost. This places some responsibility for a successful project squarely in the lap of the one who launched it. It also increases the chances of success. After all, are not we, as architects and designers, facilitators, charged with expressing a clients vision?

Demonstrating the Process – The concept images shown above demonstrate a design process. They become progressively more complete until the final design is reached in the last image. Each separate image is the result of direct communication, correction and comments from the client, who was involved in every step, beginning with the most basic parti up to final design approval.

Bridget Gaddis, is a Licensed Architect and LEED-accredited Professional practicing nationally, and locally in the Washington DC area. She holds professional degrees in both Architecture and Interior Design, and with a comprehensive background in commercial retail design, planning and construction has completed projects for such for such well known brands as Chloe, Zegna, and Bvlgari. Her career began in tenant coordination and site planning for two well-known Cleveland developers, followed by six years in store planning for a national retailer. After a move to New York City in 1997, she spent the next years working for architecture firms specializing in retail projects. In 2011 she started her own practice in Alexandria, VA. Ms. Gaddis is the author of two blogs dealing with architectural subjects.

Me and My Arrow: Recruiting in the Digital Age Part 3

Here’s a truth for you: You can’t talk about a 21st-Century recruiting strategy without talking about social media. And you can’t talk about social media recruiting without talking about employer branding. So, let’s talk about it. Social media is an ef…

Here’s a truth for you: You can’t talk about a 21st-Century recruiting strategy without talking about social media. And you can’t talk about social media recruiting without talking about employer branding. So, let’s talk about it. Social media is an effective recruitment tool not just because it can reach vast audiences, but because it highlights the values, goals, achievements and ...

Backing Up Your Business Data on the Web

Find the original archive of the video here: Backing Up Your Business Data on the Web. Most Small Business owners are not backing up their data. Small businesses are exposed to the most security threats and yet they don’t have

Find the original archive of the video here: Backing Up Your Business Data on the Web.

Most Small Business owners are not backing up their data. Small businesses are exposed to the most security threats and yet they don’t have an ability to recover from a variety of catastrophes that (not if but) will befall every Small Business. From accidents to attacks, data loss can cripple a business. In this Webinar, we covered the reasons for making your business data backup strategy a priority, and how to do it.

What we discussed in this Webinar:

1) Why you should back up your Small Business (and personal) data
2) What you should be backing up, where and how often, and
3) Backup software and services for Small Business.

NOTE: I mentioned this article in the Webinar entitled, “Cybersecurity for Small Business: It Doesn’t Keep You Up at Night? It Should!” – http://ift.tt/2xWHBdZ.


These Webinars are hosted by the Virginia Small Business Development Center Network – http://virginiasbdc.org – and presented by Ray Sidney-Smith, Author of “SoLoMo Success” (available on Amazon Kindle and paperback), Digital Marketing Strategist, and Managing Director of W3C Web Services, providing affordable Web, WordPress, email, domain and other related services for Small Business – http://web.w3cinc.com. With the transfer of your business’ domain, WordPress *and* email hosting services, get a complimentary 1-hour Web, Mobile & Social Media marketing strategy session. Email [email protected] for full details and to get started!

Don’t overlook the construction details.

Customers notice the details. They can tell if a contractor has cut corners. The transition detail in B above was installed instead of the one shown in A below. As architects we can observe the construction and point out discrepancies, but it is the client that must insist that a contractor exactly follow the details shown on the construction drawings. It is to their advantage to do so.
This bargain-basement installation detail interferes with the nice contrast between the carpet and tile.

What makes a store look expensive? Way back in 2013 I wrote a post on this site asking if a higher price could be placed on merchandise because the store design looks expensive? The post was about the impact that a curved ceiling might be expected to have on what is generally considered inexpensive merchandise. I concluded that answering the question about pricing was related to how well the design feature performed, which in the particular case in questions was quite well. I bring this up again here because I want to consider the topic in a more subtle, yet possibly more important context, that being what makes a store design look expensive?

Customers notice everything. Answering this questions means that a retailer needs to pay attention to what people notice, which is everything, whether consciously or not. The importance of “creating a shopping experience” has been a fact of retail life for quite a while now. Back in 2013 one of the retail marketers summed it up nicely when she said, “..retailers should use stores to create a brand experience that customers couldn’t possibly get online.” She went on to cite the “old adage” that “retail is detail,” saying, “stores can engage all five senses;” the online world cannot. Few would argue that the perception of quality involves more that just an online image; that tactile contact with a product is critical, including how it is displayed; that successful retailers aspire to demonstrate quality in every possible aspect of their store, because quality sells, often for more.

The refined transition detail in image A above sends a message of quality, It is what we typically specify in this situation. This contractor exactly followed the details on the construction drawings with positive results.
A refined transition strip is barely there, putting the attention on the contrasting finish materials.

The importance of quality. Clearly, since sales are seen as directly effected, most retailers are acutely aware of the quality of products they bring to the market, including a range of related price points. This is their main business and most get it right. Merchandise displays, because they are driven by practicality, are also less prone to failures in quality. Matching their actual store environment, on the other hand, is where things can begin to fall apart. Finishes, In particular, are vulnerable. Think:

  • sagging carpet,
  • old leaks exposed and never repainted,
  • light fixtures with burned out lamps,
  • cheap, broken or mismatched ceiling tiles & floor tiles,
  • stained and dirty hvac supply and return air diffusers,
  • dirty windows.

Is it really possible that customers do not notice these things, that they do not reflect on the perceived merchandise quality, that they do not contribute to a customers notion of the brand? Another marketing pundit put is this way, ” a business should always strive and prove to be the best that money can afford because that solid reputation will establish a top brand that’s reliable and worthy of respect.” I couldn’t agree more.

Bridget Gaddis, is a Licensed Architect and LEED-accredited Professional practicing nationally, and locally in the Washington DC area. She holds professional degrees in both Architecture and Interior Design, and with a comprehensive background in commercial retail design, planning and construction has completed projects for such for such well known brands as Chloe, Zegna, and Bvlgari. Her career began in tenant coordination and site planning for two well-known Cleveland developers, followed by six years in store planning for a national retailer. After a move to New York City in 1997, she spent the next years working for architecture firms specializing in retail projects. In 2011 she started her own practice in Alexandria, VA. Ms. Gaddis is the author of two blogs dealing with architectural subjects.

Me and My Arrow: Recruiting in the Digital Age Part 2

If you missed last month’s introduction to my arrow, this fall I’m devoting the blog to helping search teams make savvy decisions about where and when to invest their recruitment dollars in the digital age. We’re diligently following my Return on Investment Arrow – a handy little continuum you can use to map out a hiring strategy that is focused …

If you missed last month’s introduction to my arrow, this fall I’m devoting the blog to helping search teams make savvy decisions about where and when to invest their recruitment dollars in the digital age. We’re diligently following my Return on Investment Arrow – a handy little continuum you can use to map out a hiring strategy that is focused ...

Lead Generation on the Web for Small Business | Web and Beyond

Find the original archive of the video here: Lead Generation on the Web for Small Business | Web and Beyond. Sales is a tough area of marketing for any Small Business. It’s the lifeblood of our businesses, but it’s typically

Find the original archive of the video here: Lead Generation on the Web for Small Business | Web and Beyond.

Sales is a tough area of marketing for any Small Business. It’s the lifeblood of our businesses, but it’s typically not our area of specialty. We are service professionals and retailers, typically not sales professionals, that have gone into business. And, with the advent of the Web, sourcing leads from your website can be the primary generator of sales for a local business, but it can also be difficult to understand how. In this Webinar, we went through the process of understanding how to convert website traffic to sales and generate leads to your business.

What we discussed in this Webinar:
• why you want to create a marketing strategy for your website to increase sales to your business (even if you don’t sell anything online!),
• how to convert website traffic to sales, and
• tools and techniques for capturing leads for your business.


These Webinars are hosted by the Virginia Small Business Development Center Network – http://virginiasbdc.org – and presented by Ray Sidney-Smith, Author of “SoLoMo Success” (available on Amazon Kindle and paperback), Digital Marketing Strategist, and Managing Director of W3C Web Services, providing affordable Web, Managed WordPress, email, domain registration and other related services for Small Business – http://web.w3cinc.com. With the transfer of your business’ domain, WordPress *and* email hosting services, get a complimentary 1-hour Web, Mobile & Social Media marketing strategy session. Email [email protected] for full details and to get started!

Me and My Arrow: Recruiting in the Digital Age

Back in the day, job seekers would open a newspaper (remember them?), turn to the employment section, and circle with a red pen all the jobs they were interested in. They would then send via snail mail a well-written, typed cover letter and resume on s…

Back in the day, job seekers would open a newspaper (remember them?), turn to the employment section, and circle with a red pen all the jobs they were interested in. They would then send via snail mail a well-written, typed cover letter and resume on soft dove grey stationery with a matching envelope to the post office box in the ...

Register Now for Holiday Planning – Let the Festivities Begin! An Alexandria Small Business Development Center Workshop

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For more information about this event please contact:
Gloria Flanagan
703-778-1292 | www.alexandriasbdc.org

Alexandria Small Business Development Center
625 N. Washington Street, Suite 400
Alexandria, Virginia 22314