Hello New “Sub-Urbanism:” Market & Design Trends Before, After, & Way Way After COVID19 Part III?

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The referenced article is here, and Amazon Go is here.
Photos:  one, two, three, four, five, six.
You will find more about bricks n mortar as “touchpoints” only here.

Crossing Over the Line of Confusion

This is an instructive exercise on two levels. First lets consider the impact of merchandise placement in the black and white photo. It is quickly apparent that the main show, directly in the line of view as a customer enters or passes by the store, is an indecipherable patch work which says little about the products being sold. Also, there is actually some secondary “visual cognition”going on as our eye looks for clarity and finds it in the higher contrast which appears on the side walls where individual items or groups of items have been carefully framed by the surrounding architecture. This can be an effective technique when used in the right location; nevertheless assigning center stage to a confusion of merchandise is risky and could easily send customers searching for more understandable views in an adjacent store.

There is more to this particular story though as the second lesson is about what happens when highly saturated color is added to the mix. Suddenly what was a wall of confused merchandise becomes a high visibility focal point standing out in and being framed framed by the mid-tone world. Now the wall of merchandise has attracted attention sufficient to cross over the line of confusion and land squarely on the side of interest. Very interesting indeed.

Bridget Gaddis, is a Licensed Architect and LEED-accredited Professional practicing nationally, and locally in the Washington DC area. She holds professional degrees in both Architecture and Interior Design, and with a comprehensive background in commercial retail design, planning and construction has completed projects for such for such well known brands as Chloe, Zegna, and Bvlgari. Her career began in tenant coordination and site planning for two well-known Cleveland developers, followed by six years in store planning for a national retailer. After a move to New York City in 1997, she spent the next years working for architecture firms specializing in retail projects. In 2011 she started her own practice in Alexandria, VA. Ms. Gaddis is the author of two blogs dealing with architectural subjects.

Retail Store Design: Avoiding the “Tchotchke Effect”

As a retailer, the last thing one wants is for their merchandise to be associated with the terms like worthless, disposable, or tacky. Yet, if it looks like tchotchke because of the manner in which it is presented, that is exactly what is communicated.

The primary remedy for the tchotchke effect is to recognize that the problem exists in the first place. I have seen business savvy start ups and experienced retailers alike end up with stores resembling tourist traps. The effect has many causes. Things like high inventory levels, lack of storage, and mixed product lines are physical issues that, in my experience, are easy to fix. Psychological blocks, though, resulting in denial, can undermine store performance. Causes aside, if the symptoms are not completely evident from the photo above, here are a few main ones: over crowded merchandise, no departmental definition, no visual focus, mixed and non matching store fixtures, cheap lighting, exposed equipment… the list goes on.

Restraint is the operative word when it comes to avoiding the tchotchke effect. After that, there a few visual rules for effective retail store design that work.

1. Create a design concept.

2. Use only store fixtures that stick to the concept.

4. Place key merchandise at eye level.

3. Vary the scale.

4. Leave some empty space.

5. Create a feature.

6. Repeat in an organized way.

7. Color coordinate.

8. Use props and graphics to visually reinforce your product.

Bridget Gaddis of Gaddis Architect is a Licensed Architect and LEED-accredited Professional practicing nationally, and locally in the Washington DC area. She holds professional degrees in both Architecture and Interior Design, and with a comprehensive background in commercial retail design, planning and construction has completed projects for such for such well known brands as Chloe, Zegna, and Bvlgari. Her career began in tenant coordination and site planning for two well-known Cleveland developers, followed by six years in store planning for a national retailer. After a move to New York City in 1997, she spent the next years working for architecture firms specializing in retail projects. In 2011 she started her own practice in Alexandria, VA. Ms. Gaddis is the author of two blogs dealing with architectural subjects.

Small Business Webinar: Small Business Telecommuting

With all the technology available to businesses today, it’s easy to overlook the opportunities that bring efficiency and effectiveness to our day-to-day lives for ourselves but also our employees and contractors. One of those opportunities is telecommuting, the ability to remotely work from anywhere in the world. Many people associate telecommuting as working in your pajamas in bed or from a beach in San Juan! Remote working is so much more and we, as business owners, need to understand the positives and negatives that come from giving this great benefit and responsibility to our employees and contractors. In this Web seminar, Ray Sidney-Smith of W3 Consulting takes a Small Business through an overview of planning, implementation, review and maintenance of a telecommuting program for your organization.

What we will discuss in this Webinar:

  • Why telecommuting works? And, when it doesn’t? And, why Marissa Mayer of Yahoo! pulled the plug on their telecommuting program?
  • What does your telecommuting / remote working program need for it be effective?
  • What tools can help you make telecommuting manageable and, perhaps even, fun?

Visual Synergy

From http://fixturescloseup.com by fellow blogger Tony Kadysewski

From http://fixturescloseup.com by fellow blogger Tony Kadysewski

Wow! What a great example of what can be done with the most simple and inexpensive props. This photo, from a post by a fellow blogger about how it is easier to sell the idea of color rather than the idea of painting a wall, does a whole lot more than that. It does such a good job of attracting visual attention that even a guy living out of a suitcase might think about looking for something to decorate.

So, let’s consider what makes this work? Not only do the bold colored stools do a great job of counteracting visual noise on the glass, they are at a very recognizable “human” scale. Every one knows what the table in their living room looks like. Also the tables, size wise the biggest elements in the window, are repeated at a smaller scale in the colored boxes and paint samples in the background. These not only have the effect of drawing the passerby directly into the shop, but are also made more interesting because of the suggestive graphic used as a backdrop in the window. The synergy between the window display and the store interior is very successful in this project. The message is clearly that the interior of the store is as dynamic as the exterior. It is a message that is often overlooked by specialty retailers.

Bridget Gaddis, is a Licensed Architect and LEED-accredited Professional practicing nationally, and locally in the Washington DC area. She holds professional degrees in both Architecture and Interior Design, and with a comprehensive background in commercial retail design, planning and construction has completed projects for such for such well known brands as Chloe, Zegna, and Bvlgari. Her career began in tenant coordination and site planning for two well-known Cleveland developers, followed by six years in store planning for a national retailer. After a move to New York City in 1997, she spent the next years working for architecture firms specializing in retail projects. In 2011 she started her own practice in Alexandria, VA. Ms. Gaddis is the author of two blogs dealing with architectural subjects.

Lead Paint Renovation, Repair and Painting Regulation: Contractors and Homeowners Be Aware

The White House renovation
The White House renovation (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Prior to 1978, lead was an additive in paints used in the residential and commercial construction industry. Consequently, residential housing stock built prior to 1978 was painted with lead-containing paint. The ingestion of lead paint dust and chips is a known potential health hazard to adults and children, but particularly to children 6 years old and younger. Pregnant women are vulnerable as well because of the potential of harm to the fetus if lead dust or chips is ingested.

To remedy a perceived problem, U.S. E.P.A. promulgated the Lead Paint Renovation, Repair and Painting Regulation. Effective in its amended form on April 22, 2010, the regulation requires contractors working on pre-1978 housing stock (single family homes as well as multiple unit housing) and child occupied facilities to be a “certified renovator,” engage in work practices that contain the spread of lead dust and chips during renovation, and educate clients by providing a pre-renovation pamphlet. The lead paint renovation repair and painting regulation applies to contractors of all types whose work disturbs lead based paint and who are compensated for their work. It applies not only to renovation contractors and painters, but to window and door installation contractors, electricians and plumbers and any contractor whose work disturbs painted surfaces.

The regulation applies to work which disturbs more than 6 square feet indoors and 20 square feet outdoors. There are no opt-out provisions. Even if the residence undergoing renovation does not house the targeted population, the regulations apply and the contractors must observe the work rules.

The new regulation increases the costs of renovation projects and exposes non-compliant contractors to legal liability. The increased costs range from EPA’s estimates of $8.00 to $167.00 per project to a private estimate of $500.00 to $1,000 for the remodeling of a kitchen, painting a couple of rooms or replacing several windows. While it is unclear what the full economic impact of the regulation will be, EPA’s Inspector General criticized its cost analysis in a July 25, 2012 report. The report noted that EPA’s cost analysis failed to use a statistically valid sample and failed to consider certain necssary costs which a contractor would incur. Thus, appears that the increased costs are closer to the private estimates than to EPA’s estimate.

Finally, the contractor who violates the regulations faces potential civil and criminal penalties, with fines up to $37,500 per violation. EPA is actively enforcing the regulation. It has fined, this year, a Maine rental property owner $10,000 for using power equipment improperly to remove paint from exterior surfaces of an 1850’s building, failing to train its workers properly and failing to apply for the proper certification. In another case, EPA fined a New Jersey window and siding company $1,500 for failure to follow the dust containment, waste disposal and training regulations. Likewise, it fined a Nebraska home repair company over $5,000 for failure to provide the homeowners with EPA’s approved lead hazard information booklet and to obtain the appropriate acknowledgment regarding the renovations.

So, if you are a contractor be certain that your employees are properly trained and that you are complying with the regulations. If you are a homeowner be prepared for higher renovation costs and longer renovation times.

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